Theft Defense in Tarrant County

THEFT

Theft is a serious charge in Texas. It can range from a misdemeanor to a felony based on the alleged loss amount.

What is Theft in Texas?

The Texas Penal Code defines theft as the taking of someone’s property without consent, either by deception or by physically stealing it.

A person does not have to be in possession of the property to be charged with theft, you only have to have the property long enough to deprive the owner of its value.

In Texas, theft is an expansive charge that can cover a lot of different infractions, everything from a bounced check to shoplifting to buying stolen property to actually stealing property from someone else.

THEFT

Punishment for Theft in Texas

Punishment for the myriad of offenses ranges as well; typically punishment is based on the value of the item stolen and can go from a basic fine to lengthy prison time depending on what was stolen.

Our Experience Defending Theft Charges

We have experience representing clients facing all manners of state criminal charges, including accusations of theft, forgery, and white-collar offenses. Our knowledge and experience in these areas provide us with the tools to develop a strategy to navigate these cases and achieve the best possible outcome.

We have extensive experience defending clients on theft crime charges. Thanks to that experience, we have a unique understanding of how the prosecution will build its case and how to fight back effectively.

To schedule a consultation and learn more about how we can help you ensure you get the best defense, call (817) 203-2220.

TYPICAL THEFT CRIMES

Frequently committed theft crimes include:

Auto theft
Burglary
Carjacking
Embezzlement
Forgery
Grand larceny
Identity theft
Larceny
Theft
Receiving Stolen Property
Robbery
Shoplifting
Securing a Document by Deception
White Collar Theft Crimes

Penalties for Theft

Items stolen valued at less than $100 Class C misdemeanor A fine of not more than $500 Items stolen valued at $100 or more but less than $750
Class B misdemeanor
Not more than 180 days in a county jail and/or a fine of not more than $2,000
Items stolen valued at $750 or more but less than $2,500
Class A misdemeanor
Not more than 1 year in a county jail and/or a fine of not more than $4,000
Items stolen valued at $2,500 or more but less than $30,000
Third-degree felony
180 days to 2 years in a state jail and/or a fine of not more than $10,000
Items stolen valued at $150,000 or more but less than $300,000
State jail felony
2 to 10 years in a state prison and/or a fine of not more than $10,000
Items stolen valued at $100,000 or more but less than $200,000
Second-degree felony
2 to 20 years in a state prison and/or a fine of not more than $10,000
Items stolen valued at $300,000 or more
First-degree felony
5 to 99 years in a state prison and/or a fine of not more than $10,000

As you can see, the seriousness of theft crimes and their penalties can escalate quickly. The best strategy for someone facing a theft charge is to secure the services of an experienced attorney with a reputation for fighting hard for his client’s rights.

What is Burglary?

Beyond theft crimes other stolen property cases in Texas can involve burglary charges.

The Texas Penal Code describes burglary as the act of breaking and entering into a structure to commit another crime such as theft. In general, burglary does not require force, just an unauthorized entry into a building or other dwelling belonging to another. The crime committed after the burglary can vary from assault to kidnapping to theft to murder.

Texas defines burglary as not having the effective consent of the property owner while:

Entering a building or habitation not open to the general public to commit a felony, assault, or theft
Remaining hidden in a habitation with the intent to commit a felony, assault, or theft in the habitation
Entering a habitation or building and attempting to or actually committing an assault, felony, or theft

Punishment for Burglary

If a building is burglarized
State jail felony
180 days in state jail and/or a $10,000 fine
If a residence if burglarized
Second degree felony
2 to 20 years in prison and/or $10,000 fine
If the burglary has a sexual motive
First degree felony
5 to 99 years in a prison and/or $10,000 fine
What is Robbery?

The punishment for a robbery conviction usually depends on whether the defendant carried or used a gun or some other deadly weapon.

If a deadly weapon is not used, robbery is charged as a second degree felony in Texas. Penalties that come with being convicted of this charge include a state prison sentence of two to 20 years and/or a fine of up to $10,000.

If the charge is for aggravated robbery, penalties can include a state prison sentence of five to 99 years and/or a fine of up to $10,000.